Friday, July 08, 2016

A Hint From the IDC

IDC is Instructor Development Course. It's not a standard "Master Instructor" or "Train-the-Trainer" course in that IDC is about teaching regardless of subject. Master Instructor and Train-the-Trainer courses are usually certifying people to teach a something specific. CRGI's IDC centers around self-defense instruction because that's our common language but we're definitely not teaching a system. IDC is about the "how" of instruction, not the "what." Which probably only makes sense to me.

Garry and I taught an IDC last week. We had an extra day (one day more than last time, two or three days less than we need) so we went deeper into the business stuff and curriculum development.

Here's a thought for curriculum development, a quick and dirty thought experiment.
If 1) someone you loved was 2) going into harm's way and 3) this person was completely innocent and 4) you had five minutes on the phone to tell them how to be safer, what would you say?

That's your most important thing. It tells something about how you prioritize. I think awareness is the most important skill, but five minutes isn't even enough to make sure we have a common vocabulary. I think the most important physical skill is surviving the unexpected ambush, but that takes more time and I can't do it in words. I have something for a short advice. So should you.

If you had two hours hands on, what would you teach?

That's your core. The things every students should get as soon as possible.

If you had more time, what would you add? What is your most essential four hours of information? Eight? Sixteen? Forty?

As you write this out (you will write it out, right?) be careful to note where you get redundant or start to add things that aren't strictly necessary. That's where you start transitioning from a survival skill to an art form. Still nice, but a different thing.

As you get more time you can go deeper into subjects, and with more time you can change the order. For instance, I think the most important thing for most students is to get grounded in violence dynamics, but that's not the first thing I do in a one or two day seminar. It works better if the ice is broken by physical play, they've already had the context talk which sets the need and several references to hunting versus fighting have been filtered in. Early things prime the pump for important things later.

Counter assault is the most important physical skill, but it goes faster if the students understand drop step and structure a bit, so power generation comes first.

You get the idea. As a self-defense instructor, what's your core?

7 comments:

Mike said...

Thanks, Rory. Very helpful to think about these things.

Kai Jones said...

We would teach different classes, for sure. But your situation is special: you won't have extra knowledge with most students that you would for someone you love. So ask the question again, and answer it for a complete stranger.

The European Historical Combat Guild said...

Thanks again...
The how not what seems to be the vital thing in most areas... how to teach... w
How we learn... how to think...
In my day to day teaching the main thing I have come to realise is that of getting people to understand how they learn... rather than what they have been conditioned, both personally and culturally, to belive learning is and how it's done.

The European Historical Combat Guild said...

I'd suspect that the goal of thinking on a loved one is that It taps into what you actually make a priority than than what you may consider something worth teaching.. of course theanswer could. Should'/could be the same... but using the loved one is a trigger or gate...

The European Historical Combat Guild said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Josh K. said...

1) Do you have to go?

2) What kind of harm? Climdming a mountain or going onto a bad neighborhood?

Josh K. said...

"Fight to the goal."